US Postage stamp: Washington, 1851 Issue, 3c

US Postage stamp: Washington, 1851 Issue, 3c (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Recently, I decided it was time to try and sell my stamp collection. Its huge, takes up a lot of space, and I haven’t given it the attention it deserves in years. There are thousands of unfiltered, loose stamps to be separated out and tracked. Who has the time for that?

So after a lot of consternation, I decided to sell.

Stamp collector’s everywhere know who Mystic is. Not always the cheapest, but they sell high grade stamps, and even better, they buy collections. Mustering up the nerve, I finally called them and shipped my stamp collection off.

It has been an aggravating two and a half weeks, waiting to see what they would offer. I know my collection was a bit of a mess, but the parts that were organized weren’t laughable. There was my black penny, the mint sheets, and the complete collection of 1900-1960 US stamps. Even if the rest were only valued at a penny a piece, I should still have ball parked in the $500-$1000 range.

Now here’s the scam that is Mystic stamps buying your collection, so beware, because I know I sound like those guys on Pawn Stars that refuse to sell because the pawn shop wouldn’t pay them thousands for their used toilet paper roll collection.

Mystic doesn’t give you a quote for your collection.

They send you a check, and its your responsibility to get the check back to them in under 30 days. In my case, for four boxes of stamps, a quarter of them I know that even at a tenth of the Scott value I would at least smile, they offered less than a hundred dollars. So now I get to send them their pittance of a check back so I can pay for shipping to get my collection back. Because I think it might be worth more to me to take the time to finish sorting and mounting it than to accept a check for a few bucks.

Forewarned is forearmed. And that stamp in the picture above? I have one of those. Feel free, look it up – its an 1851 3c Washington, Scott #11.

Enhanced by Zemanta